Xena Was Black

Dennis R. Upkins

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File this under things you learn every day.

Amina was born around 1533 in Zaria, a province of today’s Nigeria. She was the daughter of Bakwa of Turunku. Their family’s wealth was derived from the trade of leather goods, cloth, kola, salt, horses and imported metals.

When Bakwa died in 1566, the crown of Zazzua passed to Amina’s younger brother, Karama. Their sister, Zaria, fled the region and little is known about her.

Although Bakwa’s reign was known for peace and prosperity, Amina chose to hone her military skills from the warriors of the Zazzau military. As a result, she emerged as leader of the Zazzua cavalry. Many accolades, great wealth, and increased power resulted from her numerous military achievements.

When her brother Karama died after a ten-year rule, Amina had matured into a fierce warrior and had earned the respect of the Zazzau military and she assumed the reign…

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Celebrating Black Speculative Fiction Month

Dennis R. Upkins

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My very good friend Boston Pobble (who recently celebrated a birthday, happy birthday again by the by) were discussing a myriad of topics. We both discussed how neither of us believe in “mere coincidence,” and there’s usually a purpose or plan to things.

Case in point. I love October. Weather begins to change, I adore Autumn. The new television lineup premieres (though these days, not many shows I care for). Halloween is one of my two favorite holidays. Christmas being the other and yes Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas is my favorite holiday movie. Halloween has always been a more spiritual holiday for me than I imagine it is for many folks for a number of personal reasons.

But that’s not all.

This weekend I will be appearing at Akai Con and I will be back at GMX on Nov. 1.

This October marks the first year of Black…

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“Inuyasha” is the shit and you can’t tell me no different (or, how “Inuyasha” is better at representing women than the vast majority of mainstream Western television shows)

It’s no secret that I’m a big fan of Rumiko Takahashi’s manga-cum-anime Inuyasha. I mean, they had me hooked at “a feudal fairy tale.” But what keeps me coming back to this series, aside from the great story and amazing characters, is how progressive it is when it comes to its portrayal of women.

When it comes to dynamic, multi-dimensional portrayals of women, Inuyasha embarrasses the fuck out of most mainstream American television.

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Attack of the Lustful Cockmonsters 2: Revenge of the Breeders

Dennis R. Upkins

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So recently through an unusual chain of events, I had an opportunity to watch the Denver Broncos exact some revenge against rival and Superbowl Champions, the Baltimore Ravens.

And for those of you who have known me for a good minute, yes, you read that correctly, Denny actually watched a football game, and yes it’s official, Hell has frozen over.

It wasn’t lost on me that Brendan Ayanbadejo was missing in action, just as it wasn’t lost on me that like Chris Kluwe is also a free agent. It’s especially a shame considering last night, Ayanbadejo’s presence probably would’ve changed the outcome of the game and could’ve spared the Ravens the smackdown that Peyton Manning and the boys put on them.

It’s also not lost on me that both Kluwe and Ayanbadejo were dropped from their teams after being immensely outspoken advocates for LGBTQ Equality.

In short, you’re looking at…

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Good bye, OUAT…

In this video, I explain just why I’m not watching this show anymore… trust me, you won’t either after watching this.

At least I’ll always have the first season.

For those of you who are curious, the Walter White Sliding Scale of Villainy was created by a good friend of mine, and you can read her post about it here.

Read it, it’s good education.